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Books

Legend

From different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths … Until June’s brother is murdered, and Day becomes the prime suspect.  In a shocking turn of events, the two uncover what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths to which their country will go to keep its secrets.

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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: 7/31/15

vilify – to utter harsh and critical things about

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Books

An Abundance of Katherines

When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine.  And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped.  Nineteen times, to be exact.  On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight Judge Judy-loving best friend riding shotgun – but no Katherines.  Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship and avenge Dumpees everywhere, and may finally win him the girl.

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Movies

Paper Towns: The Movie

If you want to check out my book review, click here.

Hands down, I loved this movie.  Cara Delevigne was an amazing Margo.  Q’s road trip with Ben, Radar, Lacey (and Angela) was hilarious.  And Ansel Elgort’s appearance as the gas station clerk?  Perfect.  That made the movie for me.  They did change the ending,  but I liked it.  It was almost better that way.

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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: 7/30/15

grandiloquence – the use of lofty words or phrases

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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: 7/29/15

indomitable – incapable of being subdued or conquered 

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Reblogged

How Did It Go Down? by Kara Rosenberg

This would be a really interesting read … It’s definitely appropriate for what this country (the USA) is going through right now.

Nerdy Book Club

how it went downHow It Went Down by Kekla Magoon starts with an all-too-familiar scenario: a black teenager, Tariq, is shot by a white man in a poor, urban neighborhood that could take place in any city in America at any point in the recent (or not-so-recent) past. The novel begins with what seems like a straightforward police report and proceeds to tell the story of the shooting’s aftermath through short vignettes, written from the perspectives of various characters connected to Tariq and his death. The story that emerges is far from straightforward and defies our stereotypes at every turn. Readers and characters have to puzzle out the truth about Tariq: was he an innocent bystander or an aspiring member of the Kings (the Peach Street gang)? Was he the victim or the criminal?

At first, there are too many characters, too many emotions, and too many versions of how it went down…

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Reblogged

This 12-Year-Old Boy Needs Books. Let’s Send Him Some.

I wonder what he likes to read … Let’s help this kid out, shall we?

101 Books

Here’s your heartwarming story for the day.

Last week, a mailman in Utah was delivering mail to the home of a 12-year-old boy, Mathew Flores. The kid was reading junk mail and asked the mailman if he had any extra.

When the mailman, Ron Lynch, asked Flores why he was reading junk mail, the boy told him that he didn’t have any books. For fun, he reads newspapers and mail.

Flores’ family doesn’t have a car, and he can’t afford the bus pass to go to the library. So, no books.

“He didn’t want electronics. He didn’t want to sit in front of the TV playing games all day. This kid just wanted to read,” Lynch said.

So, like any good trustworthy mailman, Lynch did something about it.

He posted a photo of the boy on Facebook, with a description of the situation. The post went viral on social media and found its…

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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: 7/28/15

pachyderm – an elephant 

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Movies

Gone Girl:  The Movie 

If you need a synopsis, or you just want to check out my book review click here.
Well, this was a bit lower key than the book, but that’s to be expected.  The book is always better.  I don’t know if it was just me, or if it was Rosamund Pike’s performance, but “book Amy” seemed smarter.  But they were equally calculating, I’ll give her that.  Also, “book Amy” looked different.  In my head, she looked like Heidi Powell from Extreme Weightloss.  I don’t know why, she just did.  Rosamund Pike looked the part – that is, blonde, slightly pretty, and “Oh, did I mention I’m a certified crazy person?”

I was really impressed by Carrie Coon, who played Nick’s twin sister Margo.  She was perfect; better than I could’ve imagined.

Neil Patrick Harris.  Desi Collings.  A good choice, but Neil as Desi seemed more naïve – and less obsessed and/or possessive – with Amy.
The character that surprised me the most had to be Tanner Bolt, Nick’s lawyer.  I never expected Tyler Perry in that role.  In my head, Tanner Bolt was white.  That’s not saying Perry was bad; he was really good.
On the whole, the movie was good in that it did the book justice, but it didn’t “wow” me enough to want it on blu-ray.